Tag: spiritual identity

The Essential Question

The most important question we can ask ourselves consists of three words: Who am I? Indeed, it is a question that invites regular and frequent exploration and contemplation, and one that has become increasingly essential to my ability to find grounding and peace no matter what is unfolding in my physical life.

What Is That Inner Yearning for More?

Do you sometimes struggle with being in the world? Do you feel like you’re not of this world, that it seems to confront you at every turn, and yet you have to find a way to exist in it? Do you yearn for more, but you can’t seem to find what you seek in the world? I often feel like I’m a stranger here ­— that I don’t belong — and yet, I’m here. I have to find a way to be in this world, this world that feels too harsh, that often grates against the me that feels so sensitive, so tender, so not of this world.

Nothing Can Harm the “I Am” That Is Our True Identity

A powerful realization arose within me this week: nothing can hurt my true identity as the spiritual being that I am. Indeed, nothing has ever hurt the “I am” that I am. When I act from the belief that I have been hurt or harmed in any way, I am identifying with ego – with the individual identity I have created in which I perceive myself as separate from you and from everyone else.

A Message of Love to You

Do not measure yourself against the illusions of love propagated by consumerism and marketing campaigns. Most of all, do not view yourself as “less than” those who receive grand gestures and proclamations of special love on this day that marketers use as yet another opportunity to make money in the guise of celebrating love. Rather, see what is truth beyond the glittery trappings and guilt-inducing advertisements of what has become a commercial holiday. You are Love. Period. You are God’s Child, created in Love and as Love. Your worth is not measured in the professions of love by another. Your worth is measured in the truth of your creation and being.

New Year’s Resolutions with a Twist

I would like to propose a new kind of resolution as we begin the new year — resolutions that have none of the guilt that most of our pledges arise from after the weeks of excess during the holiday season. We feel guilty about all the rich food that we have eaten, our lack of exercise and physical activity, all the liquid Christmas cheer that we have imbibed, and all the money that we have spent. Our guilt inspires impassioned vows to exercise regularly, to eat a healthy diet, to detox our bodies, to live within a budget, to pay off our credit cards… to make any number of surface changes that we hope will make us feel better about ourselves.

Prayer of Thanksgiving

Dear God,
Thank you for loving me through it all —
through all the times I thought I could do things my own way;
through all the wrong turns and stubborn choices that I made in spite of my inner guidance;
through my misguided determination to figure things out for myself.

We Are Anything But Small

We strive so hard to be worthy and to “make it” in this world. We expend huge amounts of effort to attain levels of achievement or positions that our egos tell us are markers of success. Many of us even overextend ourselves financially to buy what we can’t afford in order to project images of success. We push ourselves to do more and acquire more so that we can be more. The question is why? Why do we work so hard to meet these arbitrary standards of worth and success? Why do we fall prey to extrinsic measurements of our worth? The answer is a simple one — we have forgotten who we really are.

Slide

Contemplating the Power of My Expectations

I spent time reflecting on the following passage from Chapter 9, Section II, Paragraph 5 of the Text of A Course in Miracles this week:

The message your brother gives you is up to you. What does he say to you? What would you have him say? Your decision about him determines the message you receive.

The message my brother gives me is up to me? My decision about him determines the message I receive? I knew the truth in these words as soon as I read them, and I realized that knowing their truth placed responsibility on me for embodying this truth in my life.

%d bloggers like this: